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  • Erica Livingston

All I want for Christmas is you… to stop telling me my child will speak one day.

Hey everyone!


Quick update about myself. My anxiety is slowly but surely getting better. So I’m finally finding the motivation to get back to the things that bring me joy, such as this post. And with the holidays approaching, I’d thought I’d share some insight with you all.

My child is nonverbal, as I’ve mentioned many times beforehand. The amount of times someone has tried telling me about a friend of a friends kid that magically talked one day is insane.

Will my child speak words one day? Maybe. It does happen. HOWEVER, that is not our goal. Our goal has always been for David to communicate. And he does! He uses his iPad to specially ask for certain things and tell us things. We are still expanding upon that, but it works for us. Also, David is not only autistic. He has multiple other diagnoses that impact speech as well. So while your uncle’s boss’s cousin’s kid may have gone from nonverbal autistic to verbal, it doesn’t mean my child will. And that’s A-OK!

I believe we should just want to communicate with our nonverbal children. Speaking words are definitely not the only form of communication. Also, there is no cure for autism. Autism is not a disease! So those probiotics and diets that everyone likes sending me, stop.

David is so perfect. I wouldn’t change a thing about him because he’s exactly who he is meant to be, verbal on nonverbal. Telling me he will speak does not give me some form of hope because I don’t need hope. My child is literally everything I’ve ever dreamt of. I understand him. Whether you do or not doesn’t matter. All that matters is his health and happiness.

Happy holidays, friends! However you celebrate, if you celebrate, I hope it’s an amazing season for you all! And I promise I won’t take so long to post next time 😉


Erica

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